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(OS1) Programs Earn ISO 9001 and ISO 14001

Due to its advancements in quality assurance and sustainability standards, ManageMen (OS1) and two of its flagship programs earned ISO 9001 certification for Quality Management Systems and ISO 14001 certification for Environmental Management Systems. The Boeing Company certified ManageMen’s (OS1) program ISO 9001. This was the first time a cleaning process was certified as a component of the aerospace manufacturing process. Sandia National Labs div. Lockheed Martin achieved ISO 14001 certification for their (OS1) cleaning program in Albuquerque, NM.

With these certifications,  (OS1) programs at Boeing facilities and Sandia National Labs have become the first U.S. In-house cleaning organizations to certify their entire system—more than 1,000 facilities in several states—achieving one of the largest ever volume certifications of commercial buildings. “ManageMen has built both quality and sustainability into our overall (OS1) performance standards and operational procedures,” said Renae Walker, CEO of ManageMen, Inc. “While our commitment has continuously been recognized by our users, team members and business owners, obtaining ISO 9001 and 14001 certifications in two separate companies further validates that commitment and recognizes the company’s drive to meet globally recognized standards.”

ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 are international standards that provide a set of standardized requirements for quality and environmental management systems, respectively. Companies gain certification by implementing policies, procedures and systems that follow and meet ISO standards, which are assessed by a third-party certification body. As part of the ManageMen engineered quality process, (OS1) inspectors annually perform a series of audits and will continue ongoing assessments to monitor compliance.

Since its founding, ManageMen has made quality assurance and customer service core to its engineered cleaning system, both of which are key differentiators for the company’s performance advantage. In addition to third party certifications, the company implements a wide range of quality control tracking programs to maintain the integrity of its process and to ensure an appropriately consistent experience across all (OS1) programs in the U.S.

As a partner and service provider to numerous global companies, ManageMen will now be able to provide these stakeholders with the assurance that it has the systems in place to ensure their properties are meeting the high level of standards that only an ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 certification can provide.

About ISO

ISO is the world’s largest developer and publisher of international standards. ISO is a network of the national standards institutes of some 163 countries. More than 100 of ISO’s members are from developing countries. ISO has more than 18 600 International Standards in its currents portfolio and ISO’s work program ranges from standards for traditional activities, such as agriculture and construction, through mechanical engineering, manufacturing and distribution, to transport, medical devices, the environment, safety, information and communication technologies, and to standards for good practices and for services.


Cleaning Science

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From the February 2012 issue of The Cleaning Gazette

What is mankind’s greatest invention? Is it our built environment?

Man’s oldest invention and one that every human enjoys to some extent is the protective built environment. Humans liberate themselves from the unfavorable effects of the natural environment by an ability to construct and maintain a protective environment. We maintain shelter against enemies including weather, extreme climate, storms, predators, disease, and exposure by the habitats we build, maintain, and clean.

The primary human habitat is a built environment and a sub-compartment of the natural environment. This built environment is the environment most humans occupy more than 90 percent of their time. It dominates the quality of human life and health. It is the environment over which we have the most control. The most important control is primarily through the process of cleaning.

Cleaning is a Science

To understand the important role of cleaning and the contributions it makes to human existence, we need to know three things:

  •  What is cleaning?
  • How does it it work?
  • Why it is important?

Cleaning science includes several subjects . They must be properly understood if we are to understand the field of cleaning and its impact on health? To properly discuss “cleaning,” we must emphasize the objectives and reasons for cleaning. We must also understand and emphasize their importance and value. The science of cleaning includes the following topics:

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1. Effective Cleaning Reduces Risk.Cleaning creates a healthy condition by reducing exposure and risk. It enables sanitation, it breaks the chain of infection and prevents illness. In addition to human health, cleaning protects valuable materials and equipment and maintains the value of property. Cleaning is insurance that prevents crisis and reduces the full range of costs related to property and real estate. Cleaning also manages waste and contributes to environmental protection and sustainability.

 

2. Chemistry of Cleaning. Many aspects of cleaning are based on chemical action. Knowing how chemicals work is fundamental to cleaning. The effect they have on various forms of matter, their protective or risk-reduction benefits , the toxic, unwanted, or unintended effects on humans or the natural environment are all important parts of cleaning science.

 

3. Cleaning in Special Environments. Cleaning is the organized process of removing or repositioning unwanted matter so human activities can take place in a particular built environment. Different environments require different cleaning processes.

 

4. Measuring Cleaning Effectiveness.Cleaning is measured in terms of the quantity of unwanted matter removed. Dr. Berry’s 2006 study at the University of North Carolina showed that effective cleaning when consistently implemented is cost effective and can lead to measurable environmental improvements as measured by reductions in particles, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and biological pollutants. The assessment of cleaning effectiveness can be accomplished through process audits, environmental sampling and measurement of dusts, fungi, bacteria, and indoor-air particulate matter. Sampling and measurement answers the question, “What happens when you clean?”

 

5. Determining Cleaning Data. In recent years, there have emerged comprehensive programs for efficacy testing of cleaning processes, products and technologies. Too frequently, limited or unsubstantiated claims are made with regard to the attributes of specific cleaning products. In the absence of process or systems testing, these claims cannot be validated. Without testing, tracking effectiveness, outside auditing of environmental sustainability, human activities may be polluting the built environment rather than cleaning it.

 

6. The Professional Language of Cleaning. Every profession and science has a unique vocabulary. A language, a set of definitions, concepts, and terms. For cleaning to truly become a professional, science-based industry recognized by government, health organizations, and other critical constituents, the language of cleaning science must be organized in a systematic manner. This includes seeing cleaning terminology in its proper hierarchy; agreeing on terms; and thereafter publishing and accepting those terms as norms. Antiquated cleaning and maintenance terms should be reviewed, assessed, rejuvenated, or rejected and replaced.

 

7. Cleaning Management. Effective cleaning starts with educated management competency, professionalism, and technical leadership. A well-managed and effective cleaning program includes the following quality-management components: process identification, evaluation, and continuous improvement; management by fact and knowledge for improvement; structured problem solving; effective communication at all levels; valuing human resources; benchmarking and performance measurement; and quality tools and technology. The effectiveness of the cleaning program resides in a well-defined and comprehensive cleaning objective; planned, scheduled, systematic cleaning workloading; the use of specialized, benchmarked cleaning equipment and technology that is tested and evaluated for effectiveness, best practices and safety. Most importantly there needs to be a focused and specialized basic and inservice training provided to the cleaners.

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Cleaning for health first, to be an achievable goal, demands that our industry have a firm foundation in science. It is only through this process—of benchmarking, auditing, disciplined research, critical peer review, and open presentation—that the cleaning industry will receive the recognition it deserves as a science-based profession that is not only focused upon, but able to provide, a healthy indoor environment.

Looking for a job in (OS1)….

…check out the latest job postings available on the (OS1) Job Board:

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(OS1) Pilot Program at Parc

This video highlights the (OS1) Pilot Program at PARC at Hill Air Force Base in Clearfield, Utah. PARC is a NISH CRP that works with employees with various levels of mental and physical disabilities. Managers and employees at PARC discuss what happened during their (OS1) pilot program in 2006.

Career Paths and Professional Training for Janitor’s?

Check this out. We made a short video about the lack of professionalism and career path’s for cleaning workers in this country.

I think the video speaks for itself.